Tuveson-pancreatic-immunofluorescence-CA19-9

Possible drug target for pancreatitis

 Pancreatitis is an inflammation of the pancreas that accounts for 275,000 hospitalizations in the United States annually. Patients who suffer from hereditary pancreatitis have a 40 to 50 percent lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Dannielle Engle, a former Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) Cancer Center postdoctoral fellow who was recently appointed Assistant Professor at Salk Institute, studies the progression of pancreatitis to pancreatic cancer. She has focused on a potentially powerful biomarker, a chemical structure created by complex sugar molecules called CA19-9, since CA19-9 is elevated in patients with pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

Jeopary James

Thank You
“Jeopardy! James”

Follow the Lead of “Jeopardy! James”

Naperville Walk Team

We all watched in disbelief as Alex Trebek shared in March that he was suffering from Stage IV pancreatic cancer. This news hit Naperville, IL Walk leader Ann Zediker especially hard, as she lost her own father to the disease in 2010, just five months after he was diagnosed. She watched a man who loved life deteriorate during treatment. Now, Ann is fighting for continued research and a cure.

This year, Jeopardy! champion James Holzhauer, who won an impressive 32-straight games, caught her attention. After seeing him on the show, she learned that he was born and raised in Naperville, and she invited him to attend this year’s walk on Saturday, July 14th. While he couldn’t attend, he has added his support to the Naperville Walk in honor of Alex Trebek and all the other survivors. His generous donation of $1,109.14 represents his daughter’s birthday (November 9, 2014).

We encourage you to follow James’ example and donate amounts corresponding to your birthday, in honor or in memory of a loved one, or in support of Alex Trebek.

Your contribution will make a difference in detecting the disease earlier, developing better treatments and eventually finding a cure! And, thanks to separate funding to support administrative expenses, 100% of your donation goes directly to pancreatic cancer research.

Register Donate

 

Related Media:

NBC: ‘Jeopardy!’ champ James Holzhauer makes pancreatic cancer donation in Alex Trebek’s name
CBS: “Jeopardy James” Holzhauer donates to pancreatic cancer research to honor Alex Trebek
Fox News: “Jeopardy!’ champ James Holzhauer donates to pancreatic cancer charity walk in Trebek’s honor
CNN: “Jeopardy!” Champion James Holzhauer donated to a cancer walk in Alex Trekek’s name
ABC Chicago:  “Jeopardy! James” Holzhauer donates $1K to Naperville pancreatic cancer research walk
Chicago Tribune: ‘Jeopardy!’ champ James Holzhauer makes donation in Alex Trebek’s name to Naperville pancreatic cancer walk
Yahoo:  ‘Jeopardy!’ champion James Holzhauer donates to pancreatic cancer walk in Alex Trebek’s name
Survivornet: As Alex Trebek continues his journey with pancreatic cancer “Jeoparty James” contributes part of his fortune to finding its cure

Researchers using artificial intelligence to detect early signs of lung, pancreatic cancers

Lung and pancreatic cancers are very often difficult to treat, especially when the cancer has spread to other organs. Today, the five-year survival rate for lung cancer that has spread is 5%. For pancreatic cancer, it’s 3%. Now a group of researchers have developed a system to use computers to increase a patient’s odds.
One of the biggest challenges in cancer treatment is catching it at an early stage before it has spread.
“Something around 30% to 40% of cancers is missed during the early stages of screening,” said Naji Khosravan, a PhD Candidate at the Center for Research in Computer Vision (CRCV), University of Central Florida.

WVU researcher studies new treatment for pancreatic cancer

If the American Cancer Society’s projections prove accurate, more people will die from pancreatic cancer than from breast, brain, ovarian or prostate cancer this year.

One reason pancreatic cancer is so lethal is its resistance to traditional chemotherapy. But West Virginia University surgical oncologist Brian Boone is exploring whether FOLFIRINOX–a new combination of cancer drugs–can improve outcomes in patients whose pancreatic cancer is “borderline resectable,” meaning that a tumor may be too close to a blood vessel to be removed safely.

“The way pancreatic tumors sit, they’re very close to several important blood vessels that you really can’t live without.

Using tumor biomarkers to tailor therapy in metastatic pancreatic cancer

A new pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of using molecular tumor markers as the basis for selecting the chemotherapeutic agents to use in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. Based on these promising results a larger phase II clinical trial has been initiated using molecular biomarkers to guide the choice of second-line therapies. The design, results, and implications of the initial pilot study are presented in Journal of Pancreatic Cancer, a peer-reviewed open access publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.

The DeAlmeida Family

A Dad’s Story: Facing Pancreatic Cancer

Fred DeAlmeida, 50, and his wife Jennifer, 46, never expected to be facing Stage IV pancreatic cancer, and especially not at such a young age. Fred was diagnosed on his 50th birthday earlier this year, and in a moment, the beautiful life he and Jennifer had built together was torn apart. Now, Fred’s time is consumed with chemotherapy treatments, blood tests and scans, and Jennifer is relentlessly focused on searching for information on therapies and clinical trials in a race to get ahead of this aggressive disease.

Biomarker predicts which pancreatic cysts may become cancerous

Pancreatic cancer kills more than 45,000 people in the U.S. each year, mostly due to the fact that it is detected too late for surgery to remove and halt the spread of the cancer.

Cysts in the pancreas sometimes develop into the invasive cancer, depending on the type of cyst, but such growths often are not cancerous, creating a quandary for physicians who spot them via CT and MRI scans. Surgery to remove pancreatic cysts is often complex, so there is a need for new tools to identify which such cysts are most likely to develop into cancer and which are not.

Now, a multicenter team led by investigators at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has taken a big step toward identifying the cysts likely to become cancerous.

Lynparza stalls pancreatic cancer in patients with BRCA mutations: study

AstraZeneca and Merck & Co’s Lynparza helped patients with advanced pancreatic cancer who carry BRCA gene mutations go nearly twice as long without their disease worsening than those who received a placebo, according to data from a late-stage clinical trial presented on Sunday.

BRCA mutations are typically linked with breast and ovarian cancers, but occur in other cancers as well.

Lynparza was tested against a placebo as a maintenance therapy in 154 patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer whose tumors had not progressed after chemotherapy.

Those who received the Merck and AstraZeneca drug on average went 7.4 months before their disease began to worsen, a measure known as progression-free survival (PFS).

Alex Trebek Makes a Head-Turning Update About His Cancer Diagnosis

Alex Trebek released a statement today that his doctors says he’s in “near remission” of his advanced pancreatic cancer that was diagnosed in March, according to the Associated Press. The report continues with Trebek saying some of the tumors have shrunk by more than 50 percent; a result his doctors are calling “mind-boggling.”

This, from a disease where typically three percent of patients are alive five years after being diagnosed, according to the American Cancer Society. Is it just TV hype?

“I think that the positive response that has been achieved here does happen in patients,” says Allyson Ocean, MD, medical oncologist at New York-Presbyterian and Weill Cornell Medicine.

Recent advances in pancreatic cancer: From screening protocols to precision medicine paradigms

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, or PDAC, is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the United States, with a median 5-year survival rate of only 9%. Incidence of this cancer is rising, an effect of an aging population, improved diagnostics and the so-called “diabesity” epidemic.However, there have been several recent advances in PDAC, from efforts at cancer interception in high-risk cohorts to implementation of precision medicine paradigms, as well as newly reported, practice-changing data in surgically resected patients. Identifying high-risk cohorts for screening An important strategy for improving outcomes of patients with PDAC is the development of effective screening protocols to identify patients at a potentially resectable stage of disease.

Get Involved Today

Get inspired and connect with patients, survivors and loved ones who are all on the same journey.

Back to Top